Are Those Stylish Shoes Causing You Foot Problems?

spiked heels.jpeg
Pain vs Beauty




How many of us are guilty of sacrificing comfort for the sake of wearing a gorgeous pair of new shoes just to look good?  After all, how can we not want to look our best in something like a great pair of stilettos that do so much in how they shape and tense calf muscles while also doing wonders for how well they elongate our legs?  This is just one example of how we habitually put beauty before common sense sometimes.


I, for one, can’t help myself when my eyes meet up with the perfect shoe.  Though you know you don’t need another pair, your adoring gaze locks onto those must have shoes that you just tell yourself you will only try on.  Then, it happens.  You fall victim despite too narrow of the shoe box, overly high heels or other faults of great shoes that you sense will only hurt later.

However, there usually is a price that comes with beauty.  I am not talking about the retail price of the shoes, but the price that you may pay to your feet for wearing them.  For instance, if your feet are killing you toward the bottom of the toe area after a long day of walking, then a lower heeled shoe is something to think about. Pain beneath the toes is a sign that you’re carrying too much weight in that area for those shoes to balance properly. Narrow toe boxes that squeeze them for hours at a time can also account for that particular suffering.   


Of course, how can you forget blisters and corns that can come with the territory of those to dye for shoes. Yet, what do we do?  We run out and buy corn pads, files, pumice stones, etc. instead of shortchanging our beauty.


Another thing that you should be aware of when you check your feet is looking for the location of callouses. Crusty skin toward the farthest edges of your heel indicates that the design is causing more pressure than it should from it is distributing your weight.  When you keep wearing them, the pain that follows in time can expand to ankles and the entire foot.


Have you ever studied your footprint?  A partial outline of your foot could indicate those shoes are not giving you enough arch support.  You may want to buy supports to slip inside.  On a more serious note, you do not want to see almost the entire shape of the foot.  This is something not to take lightly. You need to see a podiatrist to evaluate for possible falling arches.   


This information is not meant to diagnose or frighten.  All that I intended was to make you more aware of what you may expect if you ignore the warning signs of foot pain caused from shoes just for the sake of fashion.  

Follow:

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.